Community
 
italiacalci...
Sito
Foto
   
 
 

Area personale

 

Archivio messaggi

 
 << Aprile 2014 >> 
 
LuMaMeGiVeSaDo
 
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30        
 
 

FACEBOOK

 
 
Creato da: italiacalcioazzurra1 il 15/03/2009
Italia Azzurra Calcio Italiano

Messaggi del 16/03/2009

 

ITALIA AZZURRA - CALCIO ITALIANO - COPPA ITALIA

Post n°19 pubblicato il 16 Marzo 2009 da italiacalcioazzurra1
Foto di italiacalcioazzurra1

Performance by club

ClubWinnersRunners-upWinning Years
Roma971964, 1969, 1980, 1981, 1984, 1986, 1991, 2007, 2008
Juventus941938, 1942, 1959, 1960, 1965, 1979, 1983, 1990, 1995
Fiorentina641940, 1961, 1966, 1975, 1996, 2001
Torino591936, 1943, 1968, 1971, 1993
Milan571967, 1972, 1973, 1977, 2003
Internazionale561939, 1978, 1982, 2005, 2006
Sampdoria421985, 1988, 1989, 1994
Lazio411958, 1998, 2000, 2004
Napoli351962, 1976, 1987
Parma321992, 1999, 2002
Bologna211970, 1974
Atalanta121963
Genoa111937
Venezia111941
Vado101922
Vicenza101997
Hellas Verona03
Cagliari02
Palermo02
Alessandria01
Ancona01
Catanzaro01
Foggia01
Novara01
Padova01
SPAL01
Udinese01
Varese01
TOTALS6068[2]
 
Condividi e segnala Condividi e segnala - permalink - Segnala abuso
 
 

ITALIA AZZURRA - CALCIO ITALIANO SPA. - COPPA ITALIA

 

ITALIA SQUADRA AZZURRA - CALCIO ITALIANO - COPPA ITALIA

Post n°17 pubblicato il 16 Marzo 2009 da italiacalcioazzurra1
Foto di italiacalcioazzurra1

Formula and pairing teams

On June 28, 2007, the format of the 2007-08 tournament was released. The new format reduced the number of competitors to the 42 teams which would play in Serie A and Serie B for the 2007-08 season; no Serie C teams would participate in the tournament. Also, the rather unusual two-leg final was eliminated. A single-match final would be played at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome[1].

The format for pairings was as follows:

  • First phase: one-leg fixtures
    • First round: The bottom 24 seeds (19-42) are paired
    • Second round: The 12 first round winners are paired
  • Second phase: one-leg fixtures
    • 6 first phase winners and seeds 9-18 are paired
  • Third phase: two-leg fixtures
    • Round of 16: 8 second phase winners are inserted into a bracket with seeds 1-8
    • Quarterfinals and Semifinals: Two-leg fixtures with pairings based upon bracket
  • Final: one-leg fixture at neutral venue

[edit] Seeding teams

Seeding is allocated as follows:

a) seed 1 to last year's Italian Cup Winner.

b) seeds 2-8 to the participants playing in the Champions League/UEFA Cup competitions other than seed 1. If less than 8 teams are participating then the next highest placed Serie A team(s) complete(s) the list.

c) seeds 9-17 to the 9 remaining Serie A teams to 17th place.

d) seeds 18-20 to the 3 Serie B teams promoted to Serie A this season.

e) seeds 21-23 to the 3 Serie A teams demoted to Serie B this season.

f) seeds 24-37 to the 14 Serie B teams finishing to 17th place but not promoted to Serie A.

g) seed 38 to the play-out winner in Serie B.

h) seeds 39-42 to the 4 Serie C1 teams promoted to Serie B this season.

 
Condividi e segnala Condividi e segnala - permalink - Segnala abuso
 
 

ITALIA AZZURRA - COPPA ITALIA

Post n°16 pubblicato il 16 Marzo 2009 da italiacalcioazzurra1
Foto di italiacalcioazzurra1

Coppa Italia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Coppa Italia
Founded1922
RegionItaly
Number of teams78
Current championsRoma
Most successful clubJuventus
Roma
(9 titles each)
WebsiteOfficial Coppa Italia Site
Coppa Italia 2008-09

The Coppa Italia (Italy Cup, officially known as TIM Cup because of its sponsorship) is an Italian football annual cup competition. Its first edition was held in 1922, but the second champions were not crowned until 1936. Roma and Juventus lead the way with nine wins. Roma has been to the most finals: 15 (Torino follows with 14). The holder can wear a "tricolore" cockade, like the roundels that appear on military aircraft, and obtains a UEFA Cup spot for the next season. Clubs that have won the competition 10 times are awarded a silver star, similarly to those who receive a gold star for winning the Scudetto 10 times. As of yet, no team has accomplished this feat though Juventus and Roma would do so with their next victory.

The tournament is known for its low attendances, mainly because most teams consider the tournament of low importance and do not field their best line-up. While some top clubs may average over 50,000 for league games, often these same clubs will attract crowds of only around 30,000 for Coppa Italia matches. Interestingly, most domestic cups elsewhere in Europe attract large crowds. It is often only the final where the UEFA Cup spot is up for grabs, that larger crowds will attend the games.

The 2007–08 Coppa Italia final was played, like the three previous editions, between Internazionale and Roma. The match was held in Rome on May 24, 2008 and ended with a 2-1 win for Roma.

Contents[hide]

[edit] Formula and pairing teams

 
Condividi e segnala Condividi e segnala - permalink - Segnala abuso
 
 

ITALIA SQUADRA AZZURRA CALCIO ITALIANO SPA.

Post n°15 pubblicato il 16 Marzo 2009 da italiacalcioazzurra1
Foto di italiacalcioazzurra1

Cities

The following table lists the Italian football champions by city.

CityTitlesWinning Clubs
Turin34Juventus (27), Torino (7)
Milan33Milan (17), Internazionale (16)
Genoa10Genoa (9), Sampdoria (1)
Bologna7Bologna (7)
Vercelli7Pro Vercelli (7)
Rome5Roma (3), Lazio (2)
Florence2Fiorentina (2)
Naples2Napoli (2)
Cagliari1Cagliari (1)
Casale Monferrato1Casale (1)
La Spezia1Spezia (1)[17]
Novi Ligure1Novese (1)
Verona1Verona (1)

[edit] See also
 
Condividi e segnala Condividi e segnala - permalink - Segnala abuso
 
 

ITALIA CALCIO ITALIANO AZZURRA

Post n°14 pubblicato il 16 Marzo 2009 da italiacalcioazzurra1
Foto di italiacalcioazzurra1

Regions

The following table lists the Italian football champions by region.

RegionTitlesWinning Clubs
 Piedmont43Juventus (27), Pro Vercelli (7), Torino (7), Casale (1), Novese (1)
 Lombardy33Milan (17), Internazionale (16)
 Liguria11Genoa (9), Sampdoria (1), Spezia (1)[17]
 Emilia-Romagna7Bologna (7)
 Lazio5Roma (3), Lazio (2)
 Campania2Napoli (2)
 Tuscany2Fiorentina (2)
 Sardinia1Cagliari (1)
 Veneto1Verona (1)
 
Condividi e segnala Condividi e segnala - permalink - Segnala abuso
 
 

ITALIA AZZURRA CALCIO

Post n°13 pubblicato il 16 Marzo 2009 da italiacalcioazzurra1
 
Condividi e segnala Condividi e segnala - permalink - Segnala abuso
 
 

ITALIA CALCIO AZZURRA

Post n°12 pubblicato il 16 Marzo 2009 da italiacalcioazzurra1
Foto di italiacalcioazzurra1

2001–02JuventusRomaFlag of France David Trézéguet (Juventus)
Flag of Italy Dario Hübner (Piacenza) (24)
2002–03JuventusInternazionaleFlag of Italy Christian Vieri (Internazionale) (24)
2003–04MilanRomaFlag of Ukraine Andriy Shevchenko (Milan) (24)
2004–05Unassigned[12][19]Flag of Italy Cristiano Lucarelli (Livorno) (24)
2005–06Internazionale[12]RomaFlag of Italy Luca Toni (Fiorentina) (31)
2006–07InternazionaleRomaFlag of Italy Francesco Totti (Roma) (26)
2007–08InternazionaleRomaFlag of Italy Alessandro Del Piero (Juventus) (21)

 
Condividi e segnala Condividi e segnala - permalink - Segnala abuso
 
 

ITALIA AZZURRA CALCIO ITALIANO SPA.

Post n°11 pubblicato il 16 Marzo 2009 da italiacalcioazzurra1
Foto di italiacalcioazzurra1

1975–76TorinoJuventusFlag of Italy Paolino Pulici (Torino) (21)
1976–77JuventusTorinoFlag of Italy Francesco Graziani (Torino) (21)
1977–78JuventusVicenzaFlag of Italy Paolo Rossi (Vicenza) (24)
1978–79MilanPerugiaFlag of Italy Bruno Giordano (Lazio) (19)
1979–80InternazionaleJuventusFlag of Italy Roberto Bettega (Juventus) (16)
1980–81JuventusRomaFlag of Italy Roberto Pruzzo (Roma) (18)
1981–82JuventusFiorentinaFlag of Italy Roberto Pruzzo (Roma) (15)
1982–83RomaJuventusFlag of France Michel Platini (Juventus) (16)
1983–84JuventusRomaFlag of France Michel Platini (Juventus) (20)
1984–85VeronaTorinoFlag of France Michel Platini (Juventus) (18)
1985–86JuventusRomaFlag of Italy Roberto Pruzzo (Roma) (19)
1986–87NapoliJuventusFlag of Italy Pietro Paolo Virdis (Milan) (17)
1987–88MilanNapoliFlag of Argentina Diego Maradona (Napoli) (15)
1988–89InternazionaleNapoliFlag of Italy Aldo Serena (Internazionale) (22)
1989–90NapoliMilanFlag of the Netherlands Marco van Basten (Milan) (19)
1990–91SampdoriaMilanFlag of Italy Gianluca Vialli (Sampdoria) (19)
1991–92MilanJuventusFlag of the Netherlands Marco Van Basten (Milan) (25)
1992–93MilanInternazionaleFlag of Italy Giuseppe Signori (Lazio) (26)
1993–94MilanJuventusFlag of Italy Giuseppe Signori (Lazio) (23)
1994–95JuventusLazioFlag of Argentina Gabriel Batistuta (Fiorentina) (26)
1995–96MilanJuventusFlag of Italy Giuseppe Signori (Lazio)
Flag of Italy Igor Protti (Bari) (24)
1996–97JuventusParmaFlag of Italy Filippo Inzaghi (Atalanta) (24)
1997–98JuventusInternazionaleFlag of Germany Oliver Bierhoff (Udinese) (27)
1998–99MilanLazioFlag of Brazil Márcio Amoroso (Udinese) (22)
1999–00LazioJuventusFlag of Ukraine Andriy Shevchenko (Milan) (24)
2000–01RomaJuventusFlag of Argentina Hernán Crespo (Lazio) (26)
2001–02JuventusRomaFlag of France David Trézéguet (Juventus)
Flag of Italy Dario Hübner (Piacenza) (24)

 
Condividi e segnala Condividi e segnala - permalink - Segnala abuso
 
 

ITALIA AZZURRA CALCIO ITALIANO SPA.

Post n°10 pubblicato il 16 Marzo 2009 da italiacalcioazzurra1
Foto di italiacalcioazzurra1

1953–54InternazionaleJuventusFlag of Sweden Gunnar Nordahl (Milan) (23)
1954–55MilanUdineseFlag of Sweden Gunnar Nordahl (Milan) (26)
1955–56FiorentinaMilanFlag of Italy Gino Pivatelli (Bologna) (29)
1956–57MilanFiorentinaFlag of Brazil Dino Da Costa (Roma) (22)
1957–58JuventusFiorentinaFlag of Wales John Charles (Juventus) (28)
1958–59MilanFiorentinaFlag of Argentina Antonio Valentin Angelillo (Internazionale) (33)
1959–60JuventusFiorentinaFlag of Argentina Omar Sivori (Juventus) (28)
1960–61JuventusMilanFlag of Italy Sergio Brighenti (Sampdoria) (27)
1961–62MilanInternazionaleFlag of Brazil José Altafini (Milan)
Flag of Italy Aurelio Milani (Fiorentina) (22)
1962–63InternazionaleJuventusFlag of Denmark Harald Nielsen (Bologna)
Flag of Argentina Pedro Manfredini (Roma) (19)
1963–64BolognaInternazionaleFlag of Denmark Harald Nielsen (Bologna) (21)
1964–65InternazionaleMilanFlag of Italy Alberto Orlando (Fiorentina)
Flag of Italy Sandro Mazzola (Internazionale) (17)
1965–66InternazionaleBolognaFlag of Italy Luis Vinicio (Vicenza) (25)
1966–67JuventusInternazionaleFlag of Italy Gigi Riva (Cagliari) (18)
1967–68MilanNapoliFlag of Italy Pierino Prati (Milan) (15)
1968–69FiorentinaCagliariFlag of Italy Gigi Riva (Cagliari) (21)
1969–70CagliariInternazionaleFlag of Italy Gigi Riva (Cagliari) (21)
1970–71InternazionaleMilanFlag of Italy Roberto Boninsegna (Internazionale) (24)
1971–72JuventusMilanFlag of Italy Roberto Boninsegna (Internazionale) (22)
1972–73JuventusMilanFlag of Italy Paolino Pulici (Torino)
Flag of Italy Gianni Rivera (Milan)
Flag of Italy Giuseppe Savoldi (Bologna) (17)
1973–74LazioJuventusFlag of Italy Giorgio Chinaglia (Lazio) (24)
1974–75JuventusNapoliFlag of Italy Paolino Pulici (Torino) (18)

 
Condividi e segnala Condividi e segnala - permalink - Segnala abuso
 
 

ITALIA AZZURRA CALCIO ITALIANO SPA.

Post n°9 pubblicato il 16 Marzo 2009 da italiacalcioazzurra1
Foto di italiacalcioazzurra1

Serie A

YearWinnerRunners-upTop scorer (club) (goals)
1929–30AmbrosianaGenoaFlag of Italy Giuseppe Meazza (Ambrosiana) (31)
1930–31JuventusRomaFlag of Italy Rodolfo Volk (Roma) (29)
1931–32JuventusBolognaFlag of Uruguay Pedro Petrone (Fiorentina)
Flag of Italy Angelo Schiavio (Bologna) (25)
1932–33JuventusInternazionaleFlag of Italy Felice Placido Borel II° (Juventus) (29)
1933–34JuventusInternazionaleFlag of Italy Felice Placido Borel II° (Juventus) (31)
1934–35JuventusInternazionaleFlag of Argentina Enrico Guaita (Roma) (31)
1935–36BolognaRomaFlag of Italy Giuseppe Meazza (Ambrosina-Inter) (25)
1936–37BolognaLazioFlag of Italy Silvio Piola (Lazio) (21)
1937–38Ambrosiana-InterJuventusFlag of Italy Giuseppe Meazza (Ambrosiana-Inter) (20)
1938–39BolognaTorinoFlag of Italy Aldo Boffi (Milan)
Flag of Uruguay Ettore Puricelli (Bologna) (19)
1939–40Ambrosiana-InterBolognaFlag of Italy Aldo Boffi (Milan) (24)
1940–41BolognaInternazionaleFlag of Uruguay Ettore Puricelli (Bologna) (22)
1941–42RomaTorinoFlag of Italy Aldo Boffi (Milan) (22)
1942–43TorinoLivornoFlag of Italy Silvio Piola (Lazio) (21)
1943–44Postponed due to Second World War
1944Spezia[17]Torino 
1944–45Postponed due to Second World War
1945–46TorinoJuventusFlag of Italy Eusebio Castigliano (Torino) (13)
1946–47TorinoJuventusFlag of Italy Valentino Mazzola (Torino) (29)
1947–48TorinoJuventusFlag of Italy Giampiero Boniperti (Juventus) (27)
1948–49Torino[18]InternazionaleFlag of Hungary Stefano Nyers (Internazionale) (26)
1949–50JuventusMilanFlag of Sweden Gunnar Nordahl (Milan) (35)
1950–51MilanInternazionaleFlag of Sweden Gunnar Nordahl (Milan) (34)
1951–52JuventusMilanFlag of Denmark John Hansen (Juventus) (30)
1952–53InternazionaleJuventusFlag of Sweden Gunnar Nordahl (Milan) (26)
 
Condividi e segnala Condividi e segnala - permalink - Segnala abuso
 
 

ITALIA AZZURRA CALCIO ITALIANO SPA.

Post n°8 pubblicato il 16 Marzo 2009 da italiacalcioazzurra1
Foto di italiacalcioazzurra1

Winners

[edit] Italian Football Championship
YearWinnerRunners-upTop scorer (club) (goals)
1898Genoa Cricket & Athletic ClubInternazionale Torino 
1899Genoa Cricket & Athletic ClubInternazionale Torino 
1900Genoa Cricket & Athletic ClubInternazionale Torino 
1901Milan Cricket & FCGenoa Cricket & Football Club 
1902Genoa Cricket & Football ClubMilan 
1903Genoa Cricket & Football ClubJuventus 
1904Genoa Cricket & Football ClubJuventus 
1905JuventusGenoa Cricket & Football Club 
1906MilanJuventus 
1907MilanTorino 
1908Pro VercelliUS Milanese 
1909Pro VercelliUS Milanese 
1909–10InternazionalePro Vercelli 
1910–11Pro VercelliVicenza 
1911–12Pro VercelliVenezia 
1912–13Pro VercelliLazio 
1913–14CasaleSS Lazio 
1914–15Genoa Cricket & Football Club [12]Torino 
1915–16Milan[13]Juventus 
1916–19Postponed due to First World War
1919–20InternazionaleLivorno 
1920–21Pro VercelliPisa 
1921–22[14]Pro VercelliFortitudo Roma 
1921–22[15]US NoveseSampierdarenese 
1922–23GenoaLazio 
1923–24GenoaSavoiaFlag of Austria Heinrich Schönfeld (Torino) (22)
1924–25BolognaAlba TrastevereFlag of Italy Mario Magnozzi (Livorno) (19)
1925–26JuventusAlba TrastevereFlag of Hungary Ferenc Hirzer (Juventus) (35)
1926–27No winner[16]Flag of Austria Anton Powolny (Inter) (22)
1927–28TorinoGenoaFlag of Argentina Julio Libonatti (Torino) (35)
1928–29BolognaTorinoFlag of Italy Gino Rossetti (Torino) (36)
 
Condividi e segnala Condividi e segnala - permalink - Segnala abuso
 
 

ITALIA CALCIO AZZURRA

Post n°7 pubblicato il 16 Marzo 2009 da italiacalcioazzurra1
Foto di italiacalcioazzurra1

History

[edit] Italian Football Championship
Juventus FC, 1903 runners-up

The first official national football tournament was organised in 1898 by the Italian Football Federation (Italian: Federazione Italiana Giuoco Calcio, FIGC).[1] This tournament, the final matches of the first Italian Football Championship, were held in a single day, 8 May 1898, in Turin. Genoa Cricket and Athletics Club were crowned as champions, defeating Internazionale Torino by 3–1 following extra time.[1] In the following years, the tournament was structured into regional groups with the winners of each group participating in a playoff with the eventual winners being declared champions. The format was modified for the 1909–10 season which was played in a league format. Nine clubs participated playing each other both home and away, and with the clubs finishing first and second playing for the championship in a single playoff final. This season was the first victory for Internazionale who defeated Pro Vercelli in the final by 10–3.[2] The 1912–13 season saw the competition nationalised with North and South divisions.[3] In 1916 Milan won the Coppa Federale, which for that season was a substitute for the championship, which had been suspended because of the First World War.[4] The tournament that year was limited to clubs from the north with the execption of Pro Vercelli but was not treated as an official trophy or recognised by FIGC as an Italian title.

Controversy hit the Championship in the 1921–22 season which saw the major clubs (including Pro Vercelli, Bologna and Juventus) in dispute with the FIGC. The teams had asked for a reduction in the number of clubs in the top division in accordance with a plan drawn up by Vittorio Pozzo, the Italian national team coach. Pozzo's plan was dismissed and the CCI (Italian: Confederazione Calcistica Italiana) was founded and organised a 1921–22 CCI league to run concurrently with the 1921–22 season organised by the FIGC.[5] Further scandal followed in the 1926–27 season when title-winners Torino were stripped of their scudetto following an FIGC investigation. A Torino official was found to have bribed opposing defender Luigi Allemandi in Torino's match against Juventus FC on 5 June 1927, and thus the season finished with no declared champions.[6]

[edit] Serie A

Following the scandal of match-fixing and the split between the FIGC and the CCI, the Viareggio charter was drawn up to legalise professionalism, ban foreign players and rationalise the championship from its regionalised state into national leagues; the Serie A and Serie B.[7] The 1929–30 season was the inaugural Serie A season and was won by Ambrosiana. The next eleven years were dominated by Juventus and Bologna who won all of the scudetti between them but further success was truncated as the Championship was suspended in 1943 due to the Second World War.[5] A Championship was held in 1944, the Campionato Alta Italia, and won by Spezia Calcio 1906.[8] The title was not officially recognised by FIGC until 2002 and even then the scudetto is considered a "decoration".[9]

The post-war years were dominated by Grande Torino while Juventus finished second three times in a row.[5] The 1950s saw the gradual emergence of Milan, with the help of Swedish striker Gunnar Nordahl who was Serie A's leading scorer (Italian: Capocannonieri) for five out of six seasons. Juventus began to dominate throughout the 1970s and early 1980s with nine scudetti in fifteen seasons while the 1990s saw Milan come to prominence.[5]

Serie A was dealt another blow by the 2006 Serie A scandal which involved alleged widespread match fixing implicating league champions Juventus, and other major teams including Milan, Fiorentina, Lazio, and Reggina.[10] The FIGC ruled Juventus be stripped of their title, relegated to Serie B and start the following season with a nine-point deduction. The other clubs involved suffered similarly with relegation and points deduction.[11

 
Condividi e segnala Condividi e segnala - permalink - Segnala abuso
 
 

ITALIA AZZURRA CALCIO ITALIANO SPA.

Post n°6 pubblicato il 16 Marzo 2009 da italiacalcioazzurra1
Foto di italiacalcioazzurra1

Italian football champions

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Scudetto

The Italian football champions (Italian: Scudetto - little shield) are the annual winners of Serie A, Italy's premier annual football league competition. The title has been contested since 1898, in varying forms of competition. While Internazionale are the current champions, Juventus has won a record 27 championship titles. The first time scudetto was used in 1924 when Genoa won its 8th championship title and decided to point a little shield as to reward and celebrate themselves, the champions.

The finals of the first Italian Football Championship was decided in a single day with four teams competing, three from Turin and one from Genoa. The title was decided using a knock-out format between the finalists with Genoa Cricket & Athletic Club the inaugural winners. The knock-out format was used until the 1909–10 season, when a league consisting of nine teams was formed. The regular league season was followed by a championship game featuring the first and second place teams. The championship, which had been confined to a single league in the north of Italy, became a national competition in 1929 with the foundation of Serie A and Serie B.

Several times in history, a champion was not named. World wars suspended the official Championship from both 1915 to 1919 and 1943 to 1945 although unofficial championships were contested in both 1916 and 1944. Match fixing prevented a champion being declared in both the 1926–27 and 2004–05 seasons with Torino and Juventus being stripped of their titles.

Contents[hide]

[edit] History

 
Condividi e segnala Condividi e segnala - permalink - Segnala abuso
 
 

ITALIA AZZURRA CALCIO ITALIANO

 

ITALIA AZZURRA CALCIO ITALIANO

Post n°4 pubblicato il 16 Marzo 2009 da italiacalcioazzurra1
Foto di italiacalcioazzurra1

Italian Football Federation

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Italian Football Federation
UEFA
Association crest
Founded1898
FIFA affiliation1905
UEFA affiliation1954
PresidentGiancarlo Abete

The Italian Football Federation (Italian: Federazione Italiana Giuoco Calcio, FIGC), also known as Federcalcio, is the governing body of football in Italy. It organises the Italian football league, Coppa Italia, Italian national football team, and the Italian women's national football team. It is based in Rome. It was a founding member of both FIFA and UEFA.

Contents[hide]

[edit] History

The Federation was founded in 1898 as the sport of football was picking up in the country and needed a formal structure to take things to the next level. The first presidency was decided in the Piedmontese capital of Turin where Mario Vicary was elected along with Luigi D'Ovidio.

In the few short years before and after the introduction of the FIGC, clubs all over the country from Genoa, Turin, Milan, Naples, Rome, Palermo and others were forming.

Between 1964 and 1980 foreign players were banned from the Italian league, primarily to revive the national team.

The FIGC was placed in administration in May 2006 as a result of the Serie A scandal of 2006 and was put under the management of Guido Rossi. In May 2006, Rossi was chosen and accepted the role of President of Telecom Italia. This appointment caused angry reactions from club presidents in Italy. On September 19, Rossi resigned his position as Commissioner of FIGC.[1][2] On September 21, Luca Pancalli, head of the Italian Paralympic Committee was chosen to replace Rossi.[3] On April 2, 2007, a president was finally elected, with former vice-president Giancarlo Abete being voted by 264 grand electors out of 271.

On the 2nd of December 2008 The Italian Football board announced the top ten all time greatest Italian football players, they were (in order):

1 - Giuseppe Meazza

2 - Luigi Riva

3 - Roberto Baggio

4 - Paolo Maldini

5 - Giacinto Facchetti

6 - Sandro Mazzola

7 - Giuseppe Bergomi

8 - Valentino Mazzola

9 - Marco Tardelli

10 - Paolo Rossi

[edit] Honors

 
Condividi e segnala Condividi e segnala - permalink - Segnala abuso
 
 

Cerca in questo Blog

  Trova
 

Ultime visite al Blog

ipersurrealistartcostantino2781roberto55fotografiaprofumeriaGeGvoice14sandy.cardenasemanuela_985pacca.cicciogiuseppepareantoniosertapuledradadomareioeroMILLEasiettadgl5oxi45ciroo321
 

Chi puņ scrivere sul blog

Solo l'autore puņ pubblicare messaggi in questo Blog e tutti gli utenti registrati possono pubblicare commenti.
 
RSS (Really simple syndication) Feed Atom